Creative flow

Recently I made my first painting. And I loved the process. It is an activity where you can completely immerse yourself in. And it is something where you are constantly switching state. 

Think of something you can make & make it with your own hands.

Add small details & then take a step back to look at the bigger picture.

Adding stuff & not overdoing it.

I loved it.

When do you experience creative flow?

My First Painting

Why I write this blog

3 reasons why I write this blog …

  1. to become a better writer: I believe that training my writing skills every day will eventually make me a better writer
  2. to better understand my own ideas and thoughts. Putting an idea into words forces me to really understand what I am thinking
  3. I love to experiment with different tools. Having my own outlet gives me the opportunity to constantly test out new tools

The day there is no news

The 8 o’clock news is always 20 minutes long. Somehow the amount of news is independent of the quantity or impact of the events that happened that day. 

News is relative. On a quiet day, the smallest remark is news. On days of national elections, that natural disaster at the other side of the world will probably stay unnoticed. 

Twenty minutes of news. That is what people expect. That is what has been programmed. That is what has been sold to the ad agency. 

I am looking forward to the day there is no news. The day there is nothing really important to say. The day the news stays quiet. And people can read, play games or just talk with eachother.

“Today there is no news. Have a great evening.”

What is important to you?

To know what is important to you at work, try to answer these questions from Seth Godin:

  1. What are you doing that’s difficult?
  2. What are you doing that people believe only you can do?
  3. Who are you connecting?
  4. What do people say when they talk about you?
  5. What are you afraid of?
  6. What’s the scarce resource?
  7. Who are you trying to change?
  8. What does the change look like?
  9. Would we miss your work if you stopped making it?
  10. What do you stand for?
  11. What contribution are you making?

[Original post Seth’s Blog: Ten questions for work that matters]